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Nov
02

CCE Brown Bag: The 50th Anniversary of Residential Desegregation at UR

12:30 PM - 1:25 PM

Tyler Haynes Commons, Room 305
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Speakers: Ayele d’Almeida, Class of 2020, Political Science and Leadership Double Major

Dominique Harrington, Class of 2019, American Studies Major, WGSS Minor

Kristi Mukk, Class of 2019, Rhetoric and Communications Major, English Minor

Jennifer Munnings, Class of 2020, Political Science and Sociology Double Major, WGSS Minor

Destiny Riley, Class of 2019, Rhetoric and Communications Major, Sociology and American Studies Minor

Location: Tyler Haynes Commons, Room 305

The Bonner Center for Civic Engagement (CCE) hosts weekly Brown Bag discussions, open to members of the campus and the community, from 12:30–1:25p.m. on most Fridays during the academic year. Each week, a speaker or small panel leads a presentation on a provocative social issue, then opens up the floor for discussion. Free pizza will be provided.

Fifty years ago this fall, the University of Richmond integrated residential facilities on its main campus, allowing black students to live on campus for the first time. During the course of the 2018-2019 academic year, a collective of students have come together to bring this history to light with a series of events on campus—from exhibits to information sessions to social events. Catalyzing university history recovered by students who have worked on the Race & Racism at UR Project, the members of the 50th Anniversary of Residential Desegregation Commemoration Committee are leading the university in honoring the stories of those who have made significant change on this campus. Archival digging has uncovered their stories, yet there are many that remain hidden and unknown--rendering the experiences of black students on this campus truly a story unfolding. Our panel consists of students who have contributed to the Race & Racism Project’s work through courses and summer fellowships and who can speak to the necessity of commemorating these historical moments today